Author Topic: Homelessness  (Read 852 times)

Offline Rex Williams

  • Posts: 3741
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #75 on: 16-02-2018, 19:37:41 »
Jane i agree with you i always wear a poppy out of respect.
seek perfection of character
sensei Enoeda 1935   2003

Offline Harley Quin

  • *
  • Posts: 12461
  • Location: Wiltshire
    • Beer and Pubs Forum
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #76 on: 17-02-2018, 16:02:51 »
I think wearing a poppy is slightly different. You aren't just showing respect for one person, but for all the millions who have given up their lives in combat. I must say, I have never seen the sense of paying good money to buy flowers for someone who has died. I am sure that the bereaved person (especially (but not exclusively) would have loved to have been given flowers when alive and could appreciate them. I am not a funeral person in that respect, I think the money spent on funerals is often excessive. Yes, have a memorial service/cremation/burial, but why spend hundreds/thousands of pounds just to make undertakers a good profit.

At my m-i-l's funereal, the undertaker offered us a cardboard urn (rather like the ones that malt whiskeys come in) and said the price was £70. It was cardboard, for goodness sake. I would have told him where to go, but out of respect (which undertakers rely on) for the family, said nothing.

I have found an almost identical one on eBay for £14.99:



I rest my case.


Harley Quin is a mystery. He appears and disappears unexpectedly and by strange tricks of light and reflections; making his clothes seem brightly multicoloured like the theatrical Harlequin.

Offline Congo Pete

  • Posts: 716
  • Location: Durham city
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #77 on: 17-02-2018, 16:12:48 »
Would it not be more sensible that instead of spending money to put flowers where someone died to rather donate that money to a memorial fund or something of that nature.

The only people benefitting by laying /putting flowers on the place where someone died are the florists. 
THERE ARE NONE SO DEAF AS THOSE WHO WILL NOT HEAR//////

Offline Mudgie

  • Posts: 1490
  • Location: Stafford
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #78 on: 21-02-2018, 02:26:41 »
Flowers is a sign of respect for their life, surely.  Everyone is entitled to that in death, even though some don't get respect in life.
Jane,
Yes, indeed but I was just indicating that I would rather give my time and money to the living, those more needy than myself, than to the dead.
As for “wearing a poppy” I bought one each year when the British Legion was all about those who had fought in the two world wars but it is not a charity I support now, and I certainly don’t agree with any expectation to wear a poppy such as in the BBC or a football team.

Offline Harley Quin

  • *
  • Posts: 12461
  • Location: Wiltshire
    • Beer and Pubs Forum
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #79 on: 21-02-2018, 09:26:21 »
I certainly don’t agree with any expectation to wear a poppy such as in the BBC or a football team.

It really irritates me to see the BBC's enforcement (although denied by them, but the evidence speaks for itself) of the 'wear a poppy rule'. It seems to start in mid-November and everyone - whether it be presenters, guests or panellists - sports one. Many now wear poppy 'brooches' - I suppose that saves money as you buy one and never have to buy another.

I was a firm believer in Remembrance Day when it was a remembrance of the two world wars. Soldiers today know what they are going into, and are not conscripted as in the early 20th century.  Having said that, I still wear a poppy, but I am mainly remembering those who fell in WWI and WWII.
Harley Quin is a mystery. He appears and disappears unexpectedly and by strange tricks of light and reflections; making his clothes seem brightly multicoloured like the theatrical Harlequin.

Offline Deej

  • Posts: 2505
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #80 on: 23-02-2018, 12:46:15 »
A poppy isn't something I choose to wear personally. I respect the right of those who want to wear one to wear it, as it's important to remember people who have lost their lives in all wars.

That said, I don't like the way how the poppy has bee thrown in our faces by some elements of the media and how people who don't wear one can be accused of being 'disrespectful' or 'unpatriotic'. I also feel that for some the poppy has become a symbol of war and even hijacked by racist parties of the far-right. It has become a political symbol for some.

If I wore a poppy, it would be a white one for 'peace', to rightly remember all victims of war, but also to hope for a world where we don't have wars and everyone can get on. I live in hope.

Offline PuffTheMagicDragon

  • Posts: 3184
  • Location: Mountains of northern Almeria, Spain
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #81 on: 23-02-2018, 14:38:15 »
Yes, I’m all for the ‘white poppy’, Deej.
Some years ago peace campaigners wore white poppies, and the media attacked them, calming disrespect and doing the Haig Fund out of money. The thing is, they were wearing them, and promoting them to be worn, alongside the traditional poppy, but in those days, peace campaigners were fair game to be attacked and ridiculed by the powers that be.

Puff
Ego is the anaesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity

Offline Congo Pete

  • Posts: 716
  • Location: Durham city
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #82 on: 23-02-2018, 14:40:50 »
What would be interesting to know is " how much of the usually £1 poppy actually goes to the British Legion" after the so-called overhead costs has been deducted?
THERE ARE NONE SO DEAF AS THOSE WHO WILL NOT HEAR//////

Offline Rex Williams

  • Posts: 3741
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #83 on: 23-02-2018, 17:55:05 »
About ten pence in pound Congo to most charities, those at top
on very big salaries unfortunately.
seek perfection of character
sensei Enoeda 1935   2003

Offline Harley Quin

  • *
  • Posts: 12461
  • Location: Wiltshire
    • Beer and Pubs Forum
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #84 on: 26-02-2018, 15:45:21 »
Quote
Why do newsreaders and all who appear on live television wear red poppies?

BBC Breakfast show and the 'irresistible' red poppy

The short answer is that the British Legion in some quarters has 'assumed' a status that few feel able to challenge - not to wear a red poppy is to be disrespectful of those who 'gave their all' and for those who believe in this dishonest formulation social and peer pressure are enough for compliance. To a few, for a variety of reasons, the red poppy is a significant and meaningful symbol but that is not the case for most poppy wearers. It is worth noting that the red poppy is the ONLY symbol that the BBC allows to be worn on screen by newscasters, that the police allow officer to wear when in uniform; other institutions have a similar policy.

http://www.ppu.org.uk/whitepoppy/white_faq.html
Harley Quin is a mystery. He appears and disappears unexpectedly and by strange tricks of light and reflections; making his clothes seem brightly multicoloured like the theatrical Harlequin.

Offline Courtenay

  • Posts: 3711
  • Location: Kent (near London)
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #85 on: 26-02-2018, 17:09:25 »
To a few, for a variety of reasons, the red poppy is a significant and meaningful symbol but that is not the case for most poppy wearers.

"... that is not the case for most poppy wearers" sounds a bit of a sweeping assumption to make. Except for people in public roles where (I agree) there IS unfair pressure to be seen wearing one, I would think most run-of-the-mill people who wear a red poppy for Remembrance choose to wear it because it does mean something to them. It's also very understandable why many people choose not to wear one. The Royal British Legion's official statement is that it's a personal choice and not compulsory (here's their webpage about it). I would say the fault is with the organisations that foster that peer pressure, not with the charity itself.

How did we get here from homelessness...?  ???

Offline Harley Quin

  • *
  • Posts: 12461
  • Location: Wiltshire
    • Beer and Pubs Forum
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #86 on: 26-02-2018, 17:55:13 »

How did we get here from homelessness...?  ???

I was thinking exactly the same! I did think about splitting this topic, but hoped we might get back on topic! I guess that is the way threads evolve.  :)
Harley Quin is a mystery. He appears and disappears unexpectedly and by strange tricks of light and reflections; making his clothes seem brightly multicoloured like the theatrical Harlequin.

Offline John Pickup

  • Posts: 3195
  • Location: Gainsborough, Lincolnshire
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #87 on: 26-02-2018, 21:47:32 »
I wouldn't want to be homeless during this current Arctic blast of weather. I hope that they find some shelter somewhere. I hear on the news that certain charities are doubling their efforts to ensure the most vulnerable are offered a bed and a meal but it must be awful even in the daytime whilst this weather persists.
Puffin Administrator

Offline Jane Marple

  • *
  • Posts: 16640
  • 'Nosey Parker'
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #88 on: 27-02-2018, 10:15:34 »
I agree John.  And many of the homeless are out there and it's not their fault too. 
"There is a great deal of wickedness in village life," said Miss Marple, softly.

Offline Mudgie

  • Posts: 1490
  • Location: Stafford
Re: Homelessness
« Reply #89 on: 01-03-2018, 01:32:59 »
To a few, for a variety of reasons, the red poppy is a significant and meaningful symbol but that is not the case for most poppy wearers.

"... that is not the case for most poppy wearers" sounds a bit of a sweeping assumption to make. Except for people in public roles where (I agree) there IS unfair pressure to be seen wearing one, I would think most run-of-the-mill people who wear a red poppy for Remembrance choose to wear it because it does mean something to them. It's also very understandable why many people choose not to wear one. The Royal British Legion's official statement is that it's a personal choice and not compulsory (here's their webpage about it). I would say the fault is with the organisations that foster that peer pressure, not with the charity itself.

How did we get here from homelessness...?  ???
Courtenay,
Yes, maybe “most run-of-the-mill people who wear a red poppy for Remembrance choose to wear it because it does mean something to them” while some do so just because they always have done.
Getting back to homelessness that’s something to which many ex-servicemen are susceptible to, not just because of what they might have been through in the forces but also because those suited to such an ordered life then can have difficulty managing on their own.